Morgan Russell Solicitors

Directors' Residential and Service Addresses

Officers of a company, LLP or overseas companies registered in the United Kingdom are required by law to provide an address for service of documents. Under the old Companies Act 1985, this had to be the officer’s home address. Under the new legislation, officers may apply to keep this information off the public record, but, in addition to a “service address” which goes on the public record, they are still required to provide a residential address to the company for whom they act and the Registrar of Companies at Companies House.

If a person (or a person who lives with that officer) considers himself/herself to be at serious risk of being subjected to violence or intimidation due to the activities of at least one of:

  • the companies of which he/she is or proposes to become an officer;
  • the companies of which he/she was an officer;
  • the overseas companies of which he/she is  or was a director, secretary or permanent representative; or
  • the LLPs of which he/she is or has been a member,

that person may apply to restrict public access to his/her residential address.

Such a director may make an application under section 243 of the Companies Act 2006 (the Act) and regulation 5 of the Companies (Disclosure of Address) Regulations 2009. The form is "Application under section 243 by an individual" – SR04[1].

In order to make such an application, a person needs to demonstrate they have sufficient grounds, that is, that the business activities might place that person, or their family members, at risk. Certain sectors of commerce or industry, for example, may attract the attentions of activists or extremists, such as a business which is licensed under the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, or a business that is a readily traceable supplier, customer or partner of such company, or which has otherwise been targeted by animal rights or other activists. Other examples include people who work, or have worked, for: Government Communications Headquarters, the Secret Intelligence Service, the Security Service or a police force.

This is not an exhaustive list and it will depend on an individual’s own circumstances as to why they may make an application to restrict the disclosure of the protected information or to make an address unavailable for public inspection. Some examples of relevant evidence might include: 

  • a police incident number if a previous attack has occurred;
  • documentary evidence of a threat or attack; or
  • evidence of disruption, violence, intimidation or other targeting by animal rights or other activists.

It will depend on the individual’s circumstances what evidence they can provide, and may include a written document or photographs if these clearly show the risk. Or, if they are making an application on the grounds that they are employed by a relevant organisation, i.e. Government Communications Headquarters, the Secret Intelligence Service, the Security Service or a police force, then they should submit evidence to establish this.

There is a £100 fee for this application.

Practical Considerations:

This means that in future, all correspondence which is addressed to the director in respect of that company, LLP or overseas company, will be sent to the address given for service, and therefore this address must be an address from which one can easily access mail.

In addition to this, there is a requirement in section 229 of the Companies Act 2006 (which has restated the position under section 318 of the Companies Act 1985) that a copy of every director’s service contract, or if the contract is not in writing, a written memorandum setting out the terms of the contract, must be open to inspection by any member of a Company without charge. A Service Contract would usually contain private information such as residential address, and therefore this is a consideration where that director has made an application as set out above.

It is therefore necessary that in cases such as this, either a director’s consent to disclosure of such private information is obtained in order to disclose it, or the address must be removed or scored out before it is sent to a member who requests it.

Further Information

If you have any questions regarding the above or require additional information or assistance, please contact Katya Cleere or Paul Morgan on +44 (0)1372 461411.



[1] An LLP member can make an application under section 243, as applied by the Limited Liability Partnerships (Application of Companies Act 2006) Regulations 2009, and regulation 5 of the Companies (Disclosure of Address) Regulations 2009. The form is "Application under section 243 by an individual member of a Limited Liability Partnership (LLP)" – LL SR03.

A director or permanent representative of an overseas company can apply for higher protection under the Overseas Companies Regulations 2009. The form is "Application for higher protection by a director or permanent representative of an overseas company to prevent disclosure to a credit reference agency of protected information" – OS SR01.

The data contained within this document is for general information only. No responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies. Readers are also advised that the law and practice may change from time to time. This document is provided for information purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. Professional legal advice should be obtained before taking or refraining from any action as a result of the contents of this document.
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